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Tough Mother and Rookies Make Up Supporting Actress Oscar Race

Tough Mother and Rookies Make Up Supporting Actress Oscar Race
Motherhood is a common theme for supporting actresses this year, from Emmy winners Laurie Metcalf and Allison Janney parenting lead actress potentials Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie in “Lady Bird” and “I, Tonya,” respectively. Then there’s Mary J. Blige’s tough matriarch in “Mudbound,” a commanding performance by the singer. Matriarch Catherine Keener is not to be trusted in “Get Out” while Holly Hunter is loving parent to a sick daughter in “The Big Sick.” And there’s a mother of a different kind with Melissa Leo in “Novitiate,” playing a Mother Reverend grappling with change. Other potential nominees include previous winner Octavia Spencer, standing out in the strong ensemble of “The Shape of Water,” previous nominee Kristen Scott Thomas bringing grace to the wife of Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour,” and newcomer Hong Chau, stealing scenes as a political activist in “Downsizing.” Buzz is also high on Lesley Manville, though “[link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Genre, Indie and Blockbuster Directors Jostle for Awards Attention

Genre, Indie and Blockbuster Directors Jostle for Awards Attention
From Paul Thomas Anderson to Guillermo del Toro to Patty Jenkins, a wide variety of directors across genres are vying for attention this awards season.

Paul Thomas Anderson

“The Phantom Thread

Not a frame of Anderson’s latest has yet been seen by the public, nor is much known about it, but he’s the rare filmmaker whose name alone can stoke anticipation. The fact that this 1950s-set film about the fashion world also stars Daniel Day-Lewis, who plans to retire from acting, only piques interest further.

Darren Aronofsky

Mother!”

Easily the most divisive studio film of 2017, and presumably intentionally so, Aronofsky’s “Mother!” could curry favor among his fellow directors for the sheer boldness of his vision, as he and star Jennifer Lawrence ascend ever-escalating levels of madness.

Sean Baker

The Florida Project

An indie darling du jour thanks to his sleeper “Tangerine,” Baker returned with yet another warm, sly-humored study of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Three Billboards’ Joins ‘Lady Bird’ as a Female-Centric Specialized Smash

  • Indiewire
‘Three Billboards’ Joins ‘Lady Bird’ as a Female-Centric Specialized Smash
For the second straight weekend, a strongly reviewed new film with a central female character broke through the clutter of this mixed fall season to great success. “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Fox Searchlight) joined “Lady Bird” (A24) as the best starts among the many top titles vying for attention, and both did so by a wide margin above other films. “Lady Bird” added other top cities and proved its first week was no fluke, showing results unequaled since “La La Land” last year.

The grosses in both cases are early results, but the films look in prime position for both greater success and maximum attention just as the awards jockeying is reaching high gear. And given that both are female-centered, and not historical figure-based like so many other titles, makes them even more vital at the moment.

Opening

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (Fox Searchlight) Metacritic: 86; Festivals include: Venice,
See full article at Indiewire »

Stream 2 Tracks From Carter Burwell’s Score For ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ [Exclusive]

  • The Playlist
This fall, you’ve likely been hearing plenty of music from Oscar-nominated composer Carter Burwell. He’s put his magic touch already on “Goodbye Christopher Robin” and “Wonderstruck,” and this month, he shows his talent and range once again with the score for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

The new film by Martin McDonagh (“Seven Psychopaths,” “In Bruges“) follows Mildred Hayes (Frances McDormand), who makes a bold move, commissioning three signs leading into her town with a controversial message directed at William Willoughby (Woody Harrelson), the town’s revered chief of police, after months have passed without a culprit in her daughter’s murder case.

Continue reading Stream 2 Tracks From Carter Burwell’s Score For ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ [Exclusive] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Goodbye Christopher Robin’ Producer On True Story Behind A.A. Milne’s Works – The Contenders London Video

  • Deadline
“I was astonished to discover, after reading the screenplay, that Christopher Robin was real. I think we had all enjoyed the books, but never computed that actually, Christopher Robin was inspired by A.A. Milne's own son,” Goodbye Christopher Robin producer Damian Jones said of the true-life basis for the Fox Searchlight film. He spoke during Deadline’s inaugural The Contenders London event this month. Directed by Simon Curtis, the drama explores the tragic true-life…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Lady Macbeth’ Leads 2017 British Independent Film Awards Nominations

Lady Macbeth topped the list of nominations for the 2017 British Independent Film Awards (Bifa) announced this morning by Maisie Williams and Hayley Squires at The London Edition.

Debut features dominate the nominations list, with the first-time writers, producers and directors of Lady Macbeth, I Am Not a Witch and God’s Own Country all recognised in the three newcomer categories – Debut Screenwriter, Breakthrough Producer sponsored by Creativity Media and The Douglas Hickox Award for Best Debut Director – as well as Best Screenplay sponsored by BBC Films, Best Director and Best British Independent Film.

Included in Lady Macbeth’s 15 nominations are nods for Florence Pugh, Naomi Ackie and Cosmo Jarvis for their performances; Naomi is nominated twice, for Best Supporting Actress and Most Promising Newcomer sponsored by The London Edition. The film has also been nominated for five technical categories, newly introduced this year, including Best Cinematography sponsored by Blackmagic Design,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Review: Goodbye Christopher Robin (2017)

When people aspire to succeed, it can sometimes result in quite incredible tales of fighting the odds to achieve victory. However, some stories of real-life achievement are not always as clear cut and blissful in their nature. And back in the mid-20s, when Winnie-the-Pooh was first released into a post-WW2 world, the story of its author A. A. Milne and its inspiration (his young son Christopher Robin Milne and his Teddy Edward) went a little lost, as the books and the character became some of the most cherished in all of children’s literature. In fact, I was not aware at all of the details of the story behind 100-Acre Wood and Winnie The Pooh and his friends but this new film from Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn) arrives to tell that very tale…and not everything is as sweet as honey that’s for sure.

Starting off rather concisely,
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Movie Review: Goodbye Christopher Robin

  • CinemaNerdz
This is not a children’s story about a child. It’s an adult story about a family. Goodbye Christopher Robin illuminates the rather gloomy profile of author A.A. Milne and his family—principally his son, Christopher Robin—and the inspiration behind Winnie the Pooh and its wild success.

Whatever pre-conceived optimisms you have about this film, toss them out and refresh your expectations. This is not the snuggly-wuggly, starry-eyed portrayal you may have hoped for. Audiences expecting a partially animated, frolicsome romp will be largely disappointed when they find that their anticipated “hunny” pots and boisterous, bouncing tigers have been replaced with bits of adapted crude war footage and the minutiae of a writer-turned-veteran’s Ptsd-induced depression.

If you can get past that, then you’re in for a fairly satisfying ride, despite some meandering storylines. Though sad, it is a fascinating portrayal. Goodbye Christopher Robin explores the relationships
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’ Review: Charles Dickens Gets a Winsome but Weary ‘Shakespeare in Love’ of His Own

  • Indiewire
‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’ Review: Charles Dickens Gets a Winsome but Weary ‘Shakespeare in Love’ of His Own
It’s only been a few short weeks since Winnie the Pooh got the “Shakespeare in Love” treatment in “Goodbye Christopher Robin” — a film that inspired this critic to lament that “we used to tell stories; now we just tell stories about how we used to tell stories” — which means that we’re already long overdue for another saccharine period fable about the creation of another literary icon. Enter Ebenezer Scrooge, who came to Charles Dickens at a moment when both men were at a low point in their lives.

The year was 1843, the great author (a manic Dan Stevens) was 31, and his massive fame was ebbing in the wake of three consecutive flops. With the winter settling in and a certain lifestyle to maintain, Dickens was in desperate need of a Christmas miracle. There was only one problem: There hadn’t been a Christmas miracle in almost 1,843 years. You see,
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’

Film Review: ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’
Of all the books Charles Dickens wrote, none has been more often adapted for the screen than “A Christmas Carol,” drawing under its spell stars as diverse as Albert Finney, Bill Murray, Jim Carrey, Mickey Mouse and the Muppets. Rather than retelling the classic once again, fresh take “The Man Who Invented Christmas” focuses on Dickens himself, revealing the equivalently satisfying story of how the English author conceived his beloved yuletide novella — while offering a chance for a splendidly cast Christopher Plummer to play Ebenezer Scrooge in the process.

Satisfying as it is to see a late-career Plummer tackle the iconic role, the subject of this particular film remains Scrooge’s creator, who may have had more in common with the old miser than audiences realize. The year was 1843, by which time Dickens (played here by “Downton Abbey” star Dan Stevens) had already tasted success, only to lose his publishers’ confidence after a series of “flops” (although
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Wonderstruck’: How Carter Burwell’s Percussive Score Carries Two New York Stories Divided by 50 Years

  • Indiewire
‘Wonderstruck’: How Carter Burwell’s Percussive Score Carries Two New York Stories Divided by 50 Years
For Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck,” composer Carter Burwell created his loveliest and most ambitious score, entering the interior worlds of two deaf children, Rose (Millicent Simmonds) and Ben (Oakes Fegley), who flee to New York 50 years apart and discover a mysterious connection at the American Museum of Natural History.

“It was about how to play those two periods [1927 and 1977] and those two kids, but at the same time not having it feel like two movies,” said Burwell, who previously collaborated with Haynes on the Oscar-nominated “Carol,” HBO Series “Mildred Pierce,” and glitter-rockfest “Velvet Goldmine.”

Finding Their Voices

Wonderstruck” weaves in and out of the black-and-white silent movie world of Rose, which, without dialogue, relies heavily on Burwell’s score, and the gritty world of Ben. Each kid searches for a missing parent to solve a puzzle and becomes immersed in two very different New Yorks (one ascendant in ’27 and the other at its nadir in ’77).

Burwell,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Crash Pad’ Clip: Domhnall Gleeson Is A Girlish Tilda Swinton [Exclusive]

  • The Playlist
Domhnall Gleeson is spending the fall season showing off his dramatic chops, appearing in Darren Aronofsky’s “mother!,” Tom Cruise’s action movie “American Made,” leading the biopic “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” and of course, getting ready for the blockbuster, “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” However, the actor is eager to show off his comic side and he does just that in the upcoming “Crash Pad.”

Co-starring Thomas Haden Church, Christina Applegate, and Nina Dobrev, the film follows a young man whose one night stand with a married woman, not only turns romantic, but takes a further twist when he befriends the wronged husband.

Continue reading ‘Crash Pad’ Clip: Domhnall Gleeson Is A Girlish Tilda Swinton [Exclusive] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Interview, Audio: Director Simon Curtis of ‘Goodbye Christopher Robin’

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Chicago – Winnie the Pooh is a cultural icon of four generations, due both to the character’s literary roots and Walt Disney’s interpretation. A new film, “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” is the origin story of the famous bear, as created by author A.A. Milne. The movie is directed by veteran helmsman Simon Curtis.

Goodbye Christopher Robin” features Dohmnall Gleeson as A.A. Milne, who was a notable playwright in 1920s England, but found himself at a crossroads in his career. Moving to the country, he began to find inspiration in the imagination of his son Christopher Robin (Will Tilston as the younger Cr) and created the books of Winnie the Pooh. The book was a runaway best seller – much to the pleasure of his flapper wife Daphne (Margot Robbie) and the consternation of the boy’s nanny (Kelly Macdonald) – but a torture to the actual Christopher Robin, who couldn’t understand the family’s sudden fame.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer,’ ‘Wonderstruck,’ and ‘Jane’ Lead Weak Specialty Box Office

  • Indiewire
At this point during the prime fall awards season (“Moonlight” opened one year ago), the arthouse box office should be humming along. It’s not. This weekend, Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” (A24) and the documentary “Jane” (National Geographic/Abramorama) showed credible initial results, while the anticipated opening of Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” (Roadside Attractions) fell shy of expectations.

These three films are catching attention ahead of a glut of upcoming biopics, which can be hit or miss. While “Victoria & Abdul” (Focus) continues to be the biggest success of the season so far, and “Loving Vincent” (Good Deed) is an arthouse sleeper, middling performer “Battle of the Sexes” (Fox Searchlight) failed to reach hoped-for heights. The next round comes in the face of widespread audience disinterest for such true stories as “Goodbye Christopher Robin” (Fox Searchlight), “Marshall” (Open Road) and “Professor Marston and the Wonder Woman” (Annapurna).

Building
See full article at Indiewire »

new and ongoing cinema releases, UK/Ire, from Oct 20

A simple listing, duplicated from the in cinemas UK and Ireland page, of new releases and other stuff currently available, for the benefit of those playing along by RSS or keeping up via the Daily Digest emails (sign up here).

opening this week The Death of Stalin I Am Not a Witch Brawl in Cell Block 99 Happy Death Day I’m planning to see… Geostorm Jungle Marshall

2017’s films, ranked by maryann

all reviews, 1997–today

now in cinemas The Big Sick Borg vs McEnroe Brimstone Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie Detroit Dunkirk Final Portrait The Glass Castle God’s Own Country The Limehouse Golem Loving Vincent The Party Pecking Order The Ritual School Life Spider-Man: Homecoming Victoria & Abdul Wind River American Made Atomic Blonde Blade Runner 2049 Despicable Me 3 Everything, Everything Girls Trip Goodbye Christopher Robin Logan Lucky American Assassin Annabelle: Creation Baby Driver Cars 3 The Emoji Movie
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

new and ongoing cinema releases, Us/Can, from Oct 20

A simple listing, duplicated from the in cinemas Us and Canada page, of new releases and other stuff currently available, for the benefit of those playing along by RSS or keeping up via the Daily Digest emails (sign up here).

opening this week The Killing of a Sacred Deer Only the Brave Wonderstruck The Snowman Same Kind of Different as Me Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween I’m planning to see… Geostorm A Silent Voice The Work expanding Breathe The Florida Project Goodbye Christopher Robin

2017’s films, ranked by maryann

all reviews, 1997–today

now in cinemas Battle of the Sexes The Big Sick Brigsby Bear California Typewriter Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie Detroit Dolores Dunkirk Faces Places The Glass Castle Ingrid Goes West Lady Macbeth Lost in Paris (Paris pieds nus) Loving Vincent Lucky Maudie Patti Cake$ Polina Professor Marston & the Wonder Women School Life Spider-Man: Homecoming Step Stronger Take My Nose…
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Goodbye Christopher Robin – Review

And once more we dive into the overflowing sea of films “inspired by true events”, though it has a touch of the “biopic”. Much as with the recent Mark Felt and Thurgood Marshall movies, it doesn’t offer a “cradle to grave” overview of the person’s life. But it certainly covers a bigger “chunk” than those flicks, going from the first World War to the second. Plus, it can considered an “origin” story of a favorite popular culture icon as with last weekend’s Professor Marston And The Wonder Women (still miffed that it wasn’t shown to the press), and like the princess, one that’s still very favored by the younger set, starring in a still steady stream of feature films (though most go straight to home video). This is the saga of author A.A. Milne whose son inspired him to write the tale of Winnie the Pooh
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Watch Exclusive 'Goodbye Christopher Robin' Video: The Story

  • Fandango
We became acquainted with an endearing teddy bear named Winnie the Pooh and his friend Christopher Robin in a popular series of short films that began appearing on the big screen in the 1960s. The fascinating origin story of the characters, however, dates back many decades and is now told in Goodbye Christopher Robin. Domhnall Gleeson and Margot Robbie star as author Alan Milne and his wife Daphne, respectively, and in our exclusive video, they talk about the experiences that led Milne to...

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